Colour Grading Task 3

Colour Grading Task 3

Task 3

For Tutorial

In conjunction with all the research material I have found on the subject matter, I have collated a series of clips from the internet  which I will use for my final edited tutorial on Colour Grading, which are below.

http://www.colorgradingcentral.com/archives/category/blog/newshttp://prolost.com/blog/2010/1/26/color-correcting-canon-7d-footage.html

https://vimeo.com/64707897 – Jons pt 1 Brings in a fast colour-corrector effect to set black and white points to get contrast back into the shot. Also selects a white point using the eyedropper tool to auto-correct the white balance. Plays with the mid tones to get it to a good contrast. Gets rid of a blue hue over the shot by using the hue colour wheel to move 180 degrees opposite to take the cast off, bringing saturation back into the shot.

Den Lennie. (2012). Color Grading 101 – Part 2- Primary Correction in Resolve 9. Available: https://vimeo.com/48811825. Last accessed 19th March 2014. Video tutorial

http://www.colorgradingcentral.com/final-cut-pro-x-color-grading-table-of-contents

http://www.creativeplanetnetwork.com/digital-cinematography/news/color-grading-2013-pros-and-cons-affordable-software/63212

colour correction.colour grading. primary is colour correction. secondary is colour grading. Colour correction which could come under primary grading is looking at luminance and hue. balancing the shot

 

 

Here I have drafted a script which I will use for my audio in the final tutorial:

Hello, my name is Victoria and I’ve made this video to talk about colour grading. I will address 4 questions in which I will answer throughout this video. The first question asking, what is colour grading? After doing some research I have concluded that everybody has variations of what they consider to be ‘Colour Grading’ including many colourist professionals. You have to consider the term ‘colour correction’ when looking at colour grading because it is a part of it. Colour correction involves adjusting the hue (the colour or chroma) and the luminance (brightness and contrast) in an image. I consider colour grading to be the overall effect given to the piece using more complex colour corrections, to create a style suited to the narrative or the artistic needs of the video. So colour correction is the correction of technical faults within the video whereas the grade is the overall style produced. Colour correction can be considered as primary grading, which I will be showing you later in this video. Colour grading has become a necessity  in film editing, whether it be film or television, but why do we colour grade?

In doing these sort of colour correction I stated before, it can eliminate a colour cast in a clip, correct video that’s too dark or too light, or set the levels to meet broadcast requirements. It can also match colour from scene to scene so the shots are continuous and flow. You can even create a mood or atmosphere using these basic colour corrections but I would refer to creating a style or mood within video as ‘Colour Grading’.

When colour grading the are many software options to consider.There are basic video grading tools within software such as Adobe After Effects,and Final Cut pro. But then there are more advanced editing software’s you can use for colour grading such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Davinci Resolve. Davinci Resolve is the most complex and arguably the best software to use. It was made specifically for colour grading and is now considered an industry standard.

Now I’ve gone through what software’s are available I will show you some basic primary grading tools within premiere pro. I feel that out of all the software’s, premiere pro is the most accessible to students and has a user-friendly interface. I will be using John Holmes primary grading tutorial and explaining his process. As I stated before primary grading uses colour correction to make the shot as accurate and clean as possible in preparation for secondary grading. In most cases when bringing your footage in, there will need to be alterations. The first step is to correct any under or over exposed shots, this could be due to an incorrect white balance during filming. He brings in a fast colour-corrector effect to do this primary grading.  He selects a white point using the eyedropper tool to auto-correct the white balance. He then uses a the hue, balance and angle colour wheel to play with the mid-tones  to get the shot to look natural like it did in its original environment without having that blue hue. He then sets black and white points to get contrast back into the shot. In essence your black points, the darkest points in your shot should have a value of 0. your white points or the brightest parts of your shot should be nearer to 1, or 100 depending which scale your using. He can see these values using graphs and scopes, which you can see here.Gets rid of a blue hue over the shot by using the hue colour wheel to move 180 degrees opposite to take the cast off, bringing saturation back into the shot.

There are so many software options and those were just a few basic tools within one of them, all of which offer many possibilities in improving a films quality. Most footage needs to be colour graded and with technology advancing all footage will be digitally captured in RAW or Flat mode and ‘Colour correction and colour grading’ will become compulsory within post-production. Thankyou for listening.

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