Page 1: Roles in TV Film Industry

Page 1: Roles Available In The TVFilm Industry

 

http://www.skillset.org/tv/jobs/art_design/article_5485_1.asp- 01.10.10

Art and design:

.Art director .Assistant art director

Art director- Usually work on feature films, commercials and some television productions. They help the Productions designer produce sets and locations. ‘In large departments on television productions’ they are also in charge of the art department’s budget and schedule of work. Also helps and works with production designer. Try to maximise money for the department. They are hired by production designer and are responsible for Assistant Art Director, the Draughtsmen*, the Art Department Assistant(s), Graphic Designers, Storyboard Artists, Model-makers and all Construction personnel. But on tv (like dramas) there may only be Production Designer, Art Director, and Production Buyer. On small tv productions the roles of Production designer and art director are combined. They usually work on freelance basis. How they work – on big budget films or tv, may start 4-5 months before actual shooting. On low budget 4 weeks can be enough. When they know the final scheduele of scenes,etc they oversee the first sets reqired being ready. They read the script and get props or special items needed. ‘Simultaneously, plans of sets and locations are drawn up by one or more draughtsmen* for the use of the Construction Managers and their teams. Throughout this extremely busy, pressured time for every member of the Art Department, Art Directors must also tightly monitor and control the budget.’ On big productions they have to have regular meetings with accountants, always have to be careful with the budget and make sure they have cost effective solutions. In pre-production they also work with any departments about any effects that’s are needed. Also involved with any vehicles, animals needed. Near shooting they work with Location manager about when sets can be put up. Oversee construction of sets and clearing up, sometimes even oversee while the shooting is going on. Have to consider health and safety all the time eg shooting in an unused building. How they get there – ‘Art Directors must learn their skills on the job, which involves starting out as an Art Department Assistant and progressing through the grades, e.g. to Junior Draughtsman, then to Draughtsman or Assistant Art Director.’ Key Skills include: free-hand drawing, perspective and technical drawing skills; a good eye for decoration and detail; a good sense of time and place; ability to conceptualise ideas; ability to think visually; methodical approach to work; ability to lead a team; ability to see the broader picture and to co-ordinate effectively; diplomacy and sensitivity when working with artists and crew; willingness to work long and irregular hours; knowledge of the requirements of the relevant Health and Safety legislation and procedures, particularly in relation to working with potentially hazardous working conditions or materials. Assistant art director: ‘They help to translate ideas into practical realities – initial sketches become worked-up drawings from which a variety of craftsmen* build sets or adapt locations.’ Usually chosen by art director or supervising arts director. There job can very on the size of production. On small sets they help the art director with things like research, making props, surveying locations, producing sets. On big productions they take responsibility of smaller sets, props and keeping the sets clean. They sketch up ideas from the production designer. After showing the production designer they refine the drawings and may turn them into 3d models. On locations they asses the area and do a ‘site survey’. When the set is being constructed, they supervise and work on each set until the first few weeks of shooting, and then their job usually ends. But sometimes if they are more experienced they will monitor the shooting of the set and will make adjustments if it is asked of them from the director or director oh photography. How they get there- ‘Most Assistant Art Directors start their careers as Art Department Assistants. After gaining experience on a small number of films or television productions, they are usually given the opportunity to join the drawing studio as a Draughtsman*. After gaining more on-the-job experience, if they impress the Art Director or Production Designer, they may be offered work as an Assistant Art Director or Standby Art Director on lower budget films or television programmes, eventually progressing to the same role on bigger productions. Most Assistant Art Directors aim to become Art Directors, Supervising Art Directors, and eventually Production Designers. Stage managers and Floor managers move into Art Department work, as do Model Makers, and some artists. Non-media draughtsmen* may also cross over.’

Key Skills include: a good eye for decoration and detail; ability to conceptualise ideas; excellent free-hand drawing, perspective, and technical drawing skills; good prop making skills and an understanding of the prop hire market; good knowledge of Design History to select props of the correct vintage; the ability to outsource props; good communication skills; initiative and the ability to work alone and/or as part of a team; ability to troubleshoot and respond to unexpected situations; a calm approach to stressful situations; diplomacy and sensitivity when working with artists and crew; willingness to work long and irregular hours; knowledge of the requirements of the relevant Health and Safety legislation and procedures.

Camera: . Camera Department Overview

TV . Script Supervisor . Camera Operator (Studio/Outside Broadcast)

TV . Camera Assistant (Studio/Outside Broadcast)

TV . Camera Operator (Portable Single Camera)

TV . Camera Assistant (Portable Single Camera)

TV . Lighting Camera (Portable Single Camera)

– TV Camera Department overview: ‘The responsibilities of people in this department depend largely on the genre of the production. On a high-budget drama or a commercial, the most senior person is the Director of Photography (who uses advanced creative and craft skills to design the look of each shot), while the Camera Operator works the camera, usually supported by one or two Camera Assistants. The most junior role is Camera Trainee/Runner which is also the conventional entry level position in this department. On a factual production and in news reporting, the Director of Photography is known as the Lighting Camera person and operates the camera him or herself, sometimes with the support of a Camera Assistant but often alone. On some low-budget productions, a DV Director directs the filming and operates the camera at the same time.’ There are also specialised camera roles on some productions such as Steadicam Operator (who operates a specific type of camera designed to film moving sequences) or Underwater Camera person. Sports and studio-based programmes are filmed by several cameras at the same time. Multi-camera Operators are given precise instructions over a headset so their role is less creative than people working in single-camera departments in other TV genres.’ Script supervisor How they get there- ‘Script Supervisors may begin their careers as Assistant Production Co–ordinators, or as Production Assistants in television, acquiring valuable on set work experience. After working as Assistants to experienced Script Supervisors for a minimum of 30 weeks, they may progress to Script Supervision on 2nd camera shoots, and 2nd unit work, eventually becoming recognised Script Supervisors. Script Supervisors may also move into other areas of production, including Producing, Writing, Directing, Editing, Script Editing.’

Camera Operator (Studio/Outside Broadcast)

TV How they get there- Although specialist technical production courses and some training schemes offer a good basic grounding in the skills and knowledge required for this role, intensive industry experience is the key. Most Camera Operators begin their careers as Camera Trainees, and work their way up through the ranks of the camera department over several years.

Camera Assistant (Studio/Outside Broadcast)

TV How they get there- Although specialist technical production courses and some training schemes offer good basic preparation for any role in the Camera department, industry experience is vital. Working as a Camera Trainee on a Studio/OB productions provides an ideal opportunity to observe how more senior Camera Assistants work, and to learn the necessary practical skills to eventually progress to becoming a Studio/OB Camera Operator.

Camera Operator (Portable Single Camera)

TV How they get there- Although film schools and training courses offer a good basic grounding in the skills and knowledge required for this role, intensive industry experience is the key. Most Camera Operators begin their careers as Camera Trainees or Runners, and work their way up through the ranks of the camera department over several years. Most experienced Operators, especially those working in drama and commercials, aim to progress to being a DP or Lighting Camera person within a few years

Camera Assistant (Portable Single Camera)

TV How they get there- Film schools and some training courses offer good basic preparation for any role in the Camera department, but industry experience is vital. Camera Trainee or Camera Runner jobs are the most common entry-level roles in the Camera department. On a television drama or a commercial, the progression is to Second Camera Assistant (also known as Clapper Loader on film) and finally to First Camera Assistant (Focus Puller). On documentaries and factual productions, only one Camera Assistant is usually employed, although increasingly Lighting Camera operators work without Assistants. Working as a Runner in a film or video tape equipment hire company, a camera manufacturing company, or a film-processing laboratory, is a good entry-level position.

Camera Operator (Portable Single Camera)

– TV How they get there- Although film schools and training courses offer a good basic grounding in the skills and knowledge required for this role, intensive industry experience is the key. Most Camera Operators begin their careers as Camera Trainees or Runners, and work their way up through the ranks of the camera department over several years. Most experienced Operators, especially those working in drama and commercials, aim to progress to being a DP or Lighting Camera person within a few years.

Camera Assistant (Portable Single Camera)

– TV How they get there- Film schools and some training courses offer good basic preparation for any role in the Camera department, but industry experience is vital. Camera Trainee or Camera Runner jobs are the most common entry-level roles in the Camera department. On a television drama or a commercial, the progression is to Second Camera Assistant (also known as Clapper Loader on film) and finally to First Camera Assistant (Focus Puller). On documentaries and factual productions, only one Camera Assistant is usually employed, although increasingly Lighting Camera operators work without Assistants. Working as a Runner in a film or video tape equipment hire company, a camera manufacturing company, or a film-processing laboratory, is a good entry-level position.

Lighting Camera (Portable Single Camera)

TV How they get there- Although some training courses offer good basic preparation for this role, practical hands-on industry experience is crucial. Most DPs and Lighting Camera Persons spend many years working at every level in camera departments across many types of productions before progressing to the role. The route usually involves starting out as a Camera Trainee/Runner or in some cases, working as Runner at a filming or video tape equipment rental company, a camera manufacturing company or a photographic or film laboratory.

 

Information below was retrieved from http://www.media-match.com/usa/jobtypes/job-descriptions.php

 

Academic Department

 

Director Oversees the daily operations of his or her assigned programs including their duty to guide students toward completion of the program,hiring staff and teachers who can successfully observe the mission of the school; collaborating with other Academic Department Directors within the school and across schools in terms of scheduling, sharing faculty, etc.; the planning and implementation of a department budget; maintain academic quality within the university; maintain and create college and communication

 

Accounting Assistant

Performs clerical work in support of company accounts and utilizes financial management software to do so. This person must compile, analyze, reconcile, and verify financial and statistical data as well as perform related work as assigned by their superior.

 

ADR Recordist

Automated Dialogue Replacement, also known as looping or dubbing. This is the critical process in film and TV whereby dialogue is recorded in a studio for any number of reasons: to replace existing production sound that is not usable either for technical considerations (usually due to a noisy location) or editorial ones (lines of dialogue have been changed); to add a voice-over to a film (often planned from the outset, but occasionally added at the last moment to help clarify a hazy plot);

 

Aerial Specialist

Camera Pilots fly the aircraft that carries the aerial camera crew (aerial director of photography (DoP) and aerial camera assistant). Together they shoot the aerial sequences that form part of the finished feature film. Camera Pilots are also responsible for flying any aircraft, including helicopters, planes, hot air balloons, etc., that appear as action props in finished films. This may involve performing difficult stunts requiring a high degree of expertise and experience.

 

Agency Assistant

Works under the company CEO as an assistant to the firm. Will be required to manage day-to-day activities in the office, as well as mailings, maintain and build client relations, media public relations, and any other duties assigned by their superiors.

 

Anchor

Anchor/Presenters work at the front line of television and radio. They introduce and host programs, read the news, interview people and report on issues and events. As the number of channels and radio stations increases, so do the openings, but opportunities to become a Presenter are still scarce and competition is fierce. Presenters work across the whole spectrum of broadcasting — national and regional television and radio, satellite and cable channels

 

Animator

Animation is the art of making images that appear to come to life on screen. It features in all kinds of media, from feature films to commercials, pop videos, computer games and websites. Animators use a range of techniques to make images appear to move, and most specialize in one of the following: * 2D drawn animation * 2D computer animation * stop frame or stop motion animation * 3D computer generated (CG) animation 2D drawn animation consists of a series of images.

 

Animator (with Live Action)

A live action/animated film is a motion picture that features a combination of real actors or elements: live action and animated elements, typically interacting. Originally, animation was combined with live action in several ways, sometimes as simply as double printing two negatives onto the same release print. More sophisticated techniques used optical printers or aerial image animation cameras, which enabled more exact positioning, and better interaction of actors and animated characters.

Concept Artist

2d/Concept Artist is a graphic artist position that works closely with other members of a design team, including the Art Director and the Storywriters. Their drawings form the basis for a film or game’s overall design. The concept artist has to produce images in a timely manner as to make short deadlines. The artist will work alongside other team members where they will create quick sketch ideas reflecting the concepts that are discussed. There will not be a lot of time spent filling in detail.
Director, Feature Film

The Director is the driving creative force in a film’s production, and acts as the crucial link between the production, technical and creative teams. Directors are responsible for creatively translating the film’s written script into actual images and sounds on the screen – he or she must visualize and define the style and structure of the film, then act as both a storyteller and team leader to bring this vision to reality. Directors’ main duties include casting, script editing ect.

 

Lighting Technical Director

A Lighting Director designs the lighting for multi camera television productions. He or she instructs the electricians’ crew in their work in addition to guiding the team of operators who usually sit with the LD in the lighting gallery. All this while working closely with the director and the rest of the production team to deliver the pictures they are hoping to see.

 

Music Editor

Music Editors help directors to achieve their musical ambitions on films, and provide a crucial link between the film and the composer. They structure the soundtrack, ensuring that all the components work together. For film music to work successfully it must be beautifully written, well performed and appropriate to the story and setting. In addition, it must be very carefully placed within the film, in order to complement the action, rather than detract from it. Music Editors’ responsibilities

 

Post Producer

A Post Producer is the integral person for film and tv that does the actual editing, dubbing, and other post production duties when the shooting and taping are complete.

 

Producer

A Producer sets the situation for the production of a television show or movie. A film Producer initiates, coordinates, supervises and controls all aspects of a production, from fundraising and hiring key personnel, to arranging for distributors. The Producer sees the project through to the end, from development to completion. Traditionally, the film Producer is considered the chief of staff while the director is in charge of the line. This “staff and line” organization mirrors that of movies

 

Rotoscope Artist

A Rotoscope Artist create mattes or traced outlines so objects in live action can be integrated into layers for films, TV shows, and video games. Before computes, Rotoscoping was done by manually tracing each frame by hand. Now, computers and software is used to make the process easier and more precise.

 

 

Runner

Production Runners assist wherever they are needed on productions and their duties vary depending on where they are assigned. They may be involved in anything from office administration or crowd control to public relations and cleaning up locations. Runners are usually employed on a freelance basis, are not very well paid, and their hours are long and irregular. The work is usually extremely varied and the Runner role offers an opportunity to learn about every aspect of the industry.

 

Sound Recordist

A member of the sound crew responsible for operating the audio recording equipment on a set.

 

Special Effects and editor

Special Effects is an artificial effect used to create an illusion in a movie. It refers to effects produced on the set, as opposed to those created in post production. Most movie illusions are created in post production. These are called visual effects. Special Effects Supervisor is the chief of a production’s special effects crew.

 

 

 Storyboard Artist

Storyboard Artists translate screenplays, or sequences from screenplays, into a series of illustrations in comic book form. These illustrations have two functions: to help directors clarify exactly what they want to achieve, and to illustrate to all other heads of department exactly what is required, e.g., prosthetics for makeup, computer generated Images (CGI) for visual effects, props for the art department, etc. In many ways comic books are the art form that most closely resembles cinema.

 

Technical Director

The Technical Director (TD) or technical producer (TP) is usually the most senior technical person within a theatrical company or television studio. This person usually possesses the highest level of competence in a specific technical field and may be recognized as an expert in that industry. The Technical Director provides technical direction on business decisions and in the execution of specific projects. He or she may be assigned to a single project, or others

 

VFX Coordinator

Works with the VFX Producer and is responsible for the artists working on a specific sequence. Takes daily notes, distributes information to team members, and updates the wall board and schedules. Also responsible for coordinating FTP and shipping.

 

 

 

 

VFX Supervisor

In charge of the overall appearance and application of the various shots. He or she will almost always be on set to make sure that things are shot in the proper way. They will be the one consulting with the client about what is needed.

Video Editor

Video Editors prepare the final version of the product. At the post production stage they take raw footage, choose the best shots and put them in order, and add sound, graphics and special effects. Skilled Editors can have a big influence in the quality of the finished piece. As a Video Editor, you would normally use digital technology and computer software to edit sound and pictures. You could work on projects including feature films, TV programs, corporate videos and commercials.

 

Visual Effects

Visual Effects are alterations to a film’s images during post production. Visual Effects Supervisor is the chief of a production’s visual effects crew.
Voiceover Artist

The Voiceover Artist is the unseen person who does the speaking necessary to create a voiceover.

Webcaster

 A Webcaster will develop and implement necessary means to integrate your company with streaming media. Much like television or radio, webcasting allows you to broadcast over the internet.
Writer

Writers are involved in the creation and/or development of all types of creative writing for film and TV. Creative writing covers a number of wide and varied forms including screen and radio (such as comedy/soap opera scripts, drama productions or documentaries). Writers may also help to create the content for video games and cartoons.


Writer’s Assistant

A Writer’s Assistant assists the head writer or writers with essential office duties, read and type scripts, as well as print and add revisions to scripts. This job requires a distinct ability to multitask and support the needs of the writer or writers with show producers, show and studio executives, managers, agents, and actors.

 

 

Below is a flowchart I made of many possible job roles in the Tv & Film industry, and how the departments and job roles are connected and how you could progress.

FLOWCHART

 

 

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